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Get involved by volunteering with our office, joining a green student org, or helping other groups in the Philadelphia area

 

SPOTLIGHT

Green Campus Tour

Guided maps of sustainability initiatives at Temple University

Climate Action Plan

Temple became a signatory of the Presidents Climate Commitment in 2008 and again in 2016.

Annual Report

Find out about Temple’s progress toward a more sustainable future by reviewing our Annual Report

Rethinking Urban Revitalization

Apr
10
Tuesday, April 10, 2018 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Paley Library Lecture Hall
*This is a Campus Sustainability Week event*
 
When it comes to urban revitalization projects, community concerns have not always been taken into account. The Eastwick Neighborhood in Southwest Philadelphia is no different. Located in the heart of a number of environmental hazards, the Eastwick community is extremely vulnerable to the oncoming effects of climate change. In 2017, The Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority sought to address these mounting risks with the Lower Eastwick Public Land Strategy. This plan is taking an innovative approach to urban revitalization through resilience planning efforts. Join the Office of Sustainability, The Temple University Library, and BRIC for an interactive discussion with planners and community members alike about the progress of the project so far, and why community engagement in urban revitalization is a core part of resilience.

 

ABOUT THE PANELISTS

Terry Williams
Terry was born in the Eastwick neighborhood of Philadelphia during the early 1950’s in what was known to be the most fully integrated neighborhood within the city of Philadelphia of that time.

Soon after his birth the largest urban renewal project in U.S. history would devastate his Eastwick Community forcing his family to move elsewhere along with the removal of eight thousand Eastwick families directly resulting from government mandated blight certifications and eminent domain powers forced upon the entire Eastwick community.

Educated in Philadelphia’s public education system Terry graduated from John Bartram H.S. in 1969. He was further educated at Temple University, taking some courses in Urban Studies, Social Statistics, Political Science and Journalism. Further he entered Lincoln Universities Masters of Human Services where he studied Psychology, Systems Theory, Religion and Philosophy. 

Coming of age during the Civil Rights, Vietnam Era, the turbulent 1960’s Terry developed an extensive background in political activism, community organizing, human services and leadership development having worked professionally, and as a volunteer within varied community specific initiatives impacting most of Philadelphia’s neighborhoods. 

Experientially, coming full circle from NortherN Liberties back to Eastwick , Terry currently chairs the Eastwick Public Lands Planning Process, and he served as the President of the Eastwick Friends and Neighbors Coalition Inc. (EFNC) (from 2012 to 2016). EFNC is the coalition he presided over that ended the so called “urban renewal “of the Eastwick Community in 2015. The community into which he was born. He also serves chairman of the Eastwick Action Membership Committee (EAC) and is a member of the Community Advisory Group (CAG) also in Eastwick.

Terry is also a founding member of the Philadelphia Climate Works Committee (PCW) a very important broad-based coalition working to reduce carbon emissions, and zero waste initiatives to insure an environmentally sustainable Philadelphia. 

Terry is also a past vice president of the Philadelphia Council of Neighborhood Organizations, he was also a past member of the West, Southwest Community Action Council, and a former executive director of for the West Philadelphia Neighborhood League.

The recipient of several community service awards including: the Chapel of The Four Chaplains Award, the Crisis Intervention Community Service Award, the Misericordia Community Service Award, and the Bread and Roses Community Services Award

“As a past president of EFNC, and chairman of the Eastwick Public Lands Planning Process I have learned the discipline, beauty, and power of community engagement and organizing door to door in Eastwick, and I have observed the compassion, brilliance and best practicing government executives as they endeavor to do no harm ”


Zakia Elliot 
Zakia Elliott is the Program Coordinator for Philadelphia Climate Works and the Sierra Club Pennsylvania Chapter. Zakia was born in Philadelphia and raised in a union family. Her past experience includes teaching nature play lessons at Philadelphia Parks and Recreation, and leading climate advocacy efforts at PennFuture. A Brown University graduate, Zakia focused her research on legislative solutions to climate change. With Philadelphia Climate Works, she will help move the City to combat climate change by justly investing in its workforce and its impacted communities. Philadelphia Climate Works is a coalition of community groups, labor unions, environmental advocates, and individuals working together to advance equity, justice, and resilience as the foundation of a safe climate future for Philadelphia.


Earl Willson
My name is Earl Wilson and I have been a resident of Eastwick, Southwest Philadelphia for more than 30 years. I am presently a retired secondary education science teacher with more than 40 years of teaching in the Philadelphia School District and the Charleston County (SC) School District. My education background includes a Bachelors Degree in Science and a Master's Degree in Administration and Supervision of Secondary Schools with a Minor in Psychology. I have been able to maximize my educational strengths to help me deal with the many challenges I have faced during the four decades that I've been in education.

Since retiring, I have focused my energy to volunteering to work for my community. I am on the Board of Directors for the following community groups: Eastwick Friends and Neighbors Coalition, Inc.: Eastwick Action Committee and the Darby Creek Valley Association. These groups are extremely concerned about the environmental and community development of the Eastwick Area and, I must say, that we are making some progress but we still have a lot of work to do.